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if Prepared by 

EDITORIAL STAFF, ARCHITECTURAL RECORD 



• Published by F. W. DODGE CORPORATION 



FOR HOME OWNERS' CATALOGS 




Planning your own home is a glorious adventure for all the 
family. It is a tremendous step you are taking, and may 
seem a little bewildering at first. Probably never again will 
you spend so much money on one thing. So you simply 
cannot afford to make mistakes, mistakes you might have 
to live with for the rest of your days. 

That's why you should go at this job slowly and seri- 
ously, using the best professional advice. This Guide is part 
of that advice, designed to eliminate some possible blun- 
ders. Dependable help makes home planning absorbing 
and rewarding, fun while you're doing it and a joy for years 
to come in the pleasure the finished product gives you. 

Home planning in its first stage is partly a family 
question-and-answer game. You know you want a home. 
But do you know exactly what kind of a home— and a setting 
—you want? If you do you're almost unique. Practically 
everyone is agreed on generalities. They want homes which 
are well planned, well built, handy, comfortable and attrac- 
tive, but they are hazy as to materials they prefer, whether 
this or that heating is the thing, where to use fluorescent 
lights, and about porches and front halls, and whether it's 
a good idea to substitute a dining area for a dining room. 

Now no one but you can answer many of the dozens of 
questions which are going to come up. But right now you 
probably don't know half the questions and certainly not 
the answers yourselves. This Guide is packed with vital 
questions to help you clarify your own ideas and make 
necessary decisions. 

After you know where you will build, supply yourself 
with a folder, lots of paper and plenty of sharp pencils be- 
fore you begin. As you discuss, make decisions and fill in 
answers, make ample notes. If you leaf through the question 



lists now, you'll find there arc many questions you're not 
yet ready to answer. When you've finished studying these 
pages, you'll be much surer about the answers. 

You will save yourself some disappointments if you set 
a rough budget before you get too far in your planning. 
It's good to have a springboard figure of what you can 
afford. Considered a good way to arrive at this is to mul- 
tiply your year's income by one-and-a-half. This will give 
you a safe cost for the house you can afford. Then multiply 
your yearly income by three and you have a maximum figure 
of cost. The final, over-all cost of your new home had best 
lie between these two amounts, just where being partly 
conditioned by how much cash you can put into your down 
payment. 

When you've got your financial status down pat and 
your rough architectural plans in hand, go and talk your 
project over with a member of a responsible money-lending 
institution in your community. One of the first things 
they'll be interested in is the neighborhood you plan to 
build in. The chances are you've spent many Sundays look- 
ing at sites and deciding just that. Only after you've picked 
your lot and straightened out a financing system, will you 
be ready to have final working drawings made and out for 
bids. But let's get back to the planning! 

Professional architectural advice is necessary to sound 
home planning. However, to get the most for the money 
you pay for this service, you'll do well to be clear as possible 
what kind of house you honestly want before you take your 
problem to the expert. He can realize your ideas in bricks 
and wood and stone and metal only if you can tell him 
precisely what they are. So gather the family around the 
conference table and start planning. 



(Copyright 1950-F. \V. Dodge Corporation) 



* 



"*■ 



* 



* 




irst things come first . . . 



* 



When it comes to home planning, every single member of 
the family should have his or her say, because you're all 
going to live together here, and God willing, be happy 
under this roof. Listen to all voices around the family 
council table. This makes a fine democratic set-up, but it 
isn't going to work unless you all know what it's practical 
to have. 

There's been a lot of talk about new developments in 
building materials and methods. Some of these are wonder- 
ful improvements, and some of them are far, 'far in the 
future. Start by bringing yourself up-to-date, getting a grasp 
on the facts. Read the pages of this book through atten- 
tively and then you'll have a basic knowledge of what's 
what. When you've finished your preliminary run-through, 
tackle the questionnaires, consulting together, and fill them 
in as far as you're able to. 

About now is the time to get out cross-section paper and 
to make your sketch diagrams of room layouts (see page 8) . 
• Try arranging room units in a general over-all scheme, 
bearing in mind the nature of your lot (best exposure, 
prevailing breeze, slope, areas for outdoor living, etc.). 
Don't get too agitated if you can't devise a scheme which 
works. Actually, that is the job of an architecturally-trained 
expert, but by making rough layouts you will prepare your- 
self to tell him some of your ideas. Try to establish dimen- 
sions which take into account the new furniture which you 
will want, so it will fit in pleasantly and conveniently. 

Spread your sketch planning over a number of sessions 
and a number of weeks. Compromises are effected gradu- 
ally. Flash ideas, at first hotly defended, subside. You're 
going to live in this house a long time. You can afford to 
take time to get it right. 



When you've got a fairly unanimous picture of what you 
like, find your expert and start working with him on it. The 
matter of money will now become increasingly important, 
because he is trained to be able to give you rough estimates 
from early sketches. Don't be down-hearted if you have to 
cut your cloth to fit your purse. Nine times out of ten an 
even better plan will emerge, sparer and more efficient than 
your first dream. 

Though you are full of enthusiasm for the life you will 
lead in your new home, in sober fact you should remember 
that one day you may want to sell it. From this point of 
view it's sage to curb any leanings toward bizarre or odd 
features. 

When you have acceptable sketch plans it is time for 
you to go back to your financing institution. You are armed 
with some estimated figures, ready to learn how best to 
swing the money end of your home. 

It is only when all this spade work is over that you will 
be ready to have final plans, working drawings, "blueprints" 
made. Naturally your expert will draw them, but don't be 
intimidated into accepting the plans if you're not wholly 
satisfied. Continue to make necessary changes and improve- 
ments until you have things right. They are simple on 
paper; they will be impossiole later without added costs 
and heartbreak after construction has started. 

The list that follows has been arranged to make it easy 
tor you to add pencil comments. Take full advantage of 
this feature. Now is the time to record all your ideas in full. 
Later will be too late. 

Check or fill in all the items you can on the next page 
thinking always of what you really want to do in your new 
home, and the facilities therefore to be provided. 



* 



NtEDS 



Rt QU\Rt* 






^ ON 



,OUOV^ e '* 



* 



HOME OWNERS CATALOGS 



Ne eds and Requirements 



Check List 



V* 



MRS. 



profession OR other work Office work at home fj Requires space ...ft. by ft. 

Studio □ Music room □ Requires space ft. by ft. 

hobbies or collections (list) Requires space ft, by ft. 

sports (list) Requires space ft. by ft. 

OTHER ACTIVITIES 

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS 

/ Separate bedroom □ Shared with Size of room desired ft. by ft. 

sleeping <j Beds: twin fj double □ single □ sleeping porch □ Windows open n fj s □ e □ w □ 
I Other comments 

( Separate dressing room fj Built-in units 

dressing < Combined dressing room and bath □ Combined dressing room and wardrobe □ 
{ Vanity □ Dresser Q Triple mirror fj Full length mirror fj Safe fj 

( for the following number of 
closet and storage space } suits , dresses ..„, hats , coats , shoes , sport clothes , 

( Other clothing (list) 

special furniture or equipment (list) Mothproof storage space fj Fireplace fj Telephone fj 
Radio □ 



^ 



1* 



MR. 



business or profession Office work at home requires space ft. by ft. 

hobbies or collections (list) Requires space ft. by ft. 

sports (list) Requires storage space ft. by ft. 

other activities Special requirements 



. i 



Separate bed room fj Shared with Size of room desired FT. 



by. 



FT. 



sleeping < Beds: twin fj double fj single fj sleeping porch □ Windows open n □ sfj EfJ wQ 



Other comments. 



dressing 



Separate dressing room fj Combined dressing room and bath fj Combined dressing room 
and wardrobe fj Dresser fj Mirror fj Safe fj Built-in units (describe their use) 



CLOSET and storage space for the following number of suits , shoes i, hats , coats 

Other clothing (list) 

special furniture or equipment (list) Mothproof storage space fj Fireplace fj Telephone n 
Radio fj ; 















CHILDREN 

NAME AGE 

hobbies and sports Requires space FT. BY FT. 

WORK OR STUDY SPACE REQUIRED FT. BY FT. Storage space FT. BY FT. 

sleeping. Separate bed room □ Shared with Desired size ft. by ft. 

Bed: Single □ Double □ Twin Q Single bunk □ Double deck bunk \J Windows open N Q s Q E D w D 

dressing. Separate dressing room Q Built-in units 

closet and storage space for the following number of suits , dresses , hats , coats , shoes 

Also space ft. by ft. for storage of toys and games 

special furniture (list) 



NAME AGE 

hobbies and sports Requires space ft. by ft. 

work or study space required ft. by ft. Storage space ft. by ft. 

sleeping. Separate bed room □ Shared with Desired size FT. by.. ft. 

Bed: Single \J Double \J Twin {J Single bunk fj Double deck bunk \J Windows open n Qs □ e \J w fj 

dressing. Separate dressing room □ Built-in units 

closet and storage space for the following number of suits , dresses , hats , coats , shoes 

Also space ft. by ft. for storage of toys and games 

special furniture (list) 



AGE 



NAME 

hobbies and sports Requires space ft. by ft. 

WORK OR STUDY SPACE REQUIRED FT. BY FT. Storage space FT. BY FT. 

sleeping. Separate bed room Q Shared with Desired si2e FT. by ft. 

Bed: Single □ Double □ Twin \J Single bunk \J Double deck bunk □ Windows open N Q s □ E □ w □ 

dressing. Separate dressing room Q Built-in units 

closet and storage space for the following number of suits , dresses , hats , coats , shoes 

Also space ft. by. ft. for storage of toys and games 

SPECIAL FURNITURE (list) 



other resident (name) Relationship.. 

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS 



N eeds and Requirements 



, Check List 



*l 



*fe 



GROUP ACTIVITIES 

TYPES OF entertainment: (maximum number of guests to be filled in blanks) 

DINNERS MUSICALS TEAS 

CLUB MEETINGS LUNCHEONS GARDEN PARTIES 

HOME MOVIES , DANCES GAMES (children) 

CARD PARTIES BUFFET SUPPERS TELEVISION 



GENERAL REQUIREMENTS SUMMARY 

living room Size ft. by ft. Ceiling height ft. Living room activities. 



Is close relation between indoor and outdoor living spaces desired yes Q No[] 
dining room Size ft. by ft. Separate □ Combined with 



library or den Size ft. by ft. How many feet of shelving Fireplace □ 

powder room Size ft. by ft. Lavatory Q with door to 

game room Size ft. by ft. Where located 

Special requirements • - 

garage Number of cars Other uses: Work bench □ Garden Tools □ Bicycles □ 

Storage for • 

outdoor living areas desired Covered porch □ Screened porch □ Terraces □ Upper level sun 

decks □ Green house □ Sun room □ 

style of house desired (Type of architecture) 

One story house Q Two story house □ Is basement desired yes Q no Q 
uses of basement Hobby shop □ Home work shop fj Game room □ Photographic dark room Q 
Storage for 



SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS.. 






Your land 

and your home . . 



, u ,» if vou haven't one 
Y nrobablv have your lot : bu * y th h 

lou P toba *- st ions should kee P miinitv ? and will 
already, two g*» ^ ^ co-^J use we have 
your mmd-Uo suitable Ior the n 

to like the people ij h 

° r children's ages- buse5 places oi 



a . Have "V-nle who live »~— 

E ' *«' SU that .1- P»« &T.S3 

For the budget, note exceed 20 per 

Sr 1 " .,«.*.<«»*-?B 



«rthcrW direction 

shows how rooms can 

the compass goes consider ations. A ho ;f J certa in 

1 But there are oth« «o« advantage of gj 

for a leVCl f Matures "3S can be ^J?J? c0t n« 
charming features treatment, ideal* >t 

^ a tS V al vaS - - u S de Xre A you will 
<*' ^^ he landscaping posstb' > tu*. ^ areaS 

forget tne » play-space, ou privacy. 

ha r:.& r e d «"'e« wi»be -f^SS «W 
r L U-nd Una-p-ng a« d ^ 

length on page 2/0 ,• htlv intangible t aCto \ oU ' re 
16 linally there is a subtly ^ q{ com mumty ^ ^ 

u,«. P7 e. Also ' > g c \ t .„ opne ral it nc }& ^ panning. 



ia Krine n or m***- — 

lge system. brmg ^^ 

'"To go back to .he ««*£ "house, you »yj 

*"" 'rvbegtplanningyo-^rbuMing must be 
voumayoeg" v t an d trie " possible 

1°<- EitheI S they end up in the closest p 
tieate.1 so that tney ft wiU 

^!^lo^t.Vma.e : hemosto f th 



means to you Uplanmn ~ ■;•- d oH* ?-£££ 

o f * £ ■aJSff*' m ° Sl SlSiSS h»« ""' 
breeze. Also to ^g „i its go Wtchen 

«P erien "fa« south, southeast ot east We 

^/SoTblt west (to avctl 






You 

draw 
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and most accurate way to set about that. What you are after is general proportions 

i plans is on cross-section or graph and relationship of rooms to each other on the lot. 

led into l /g inch squares by light blue To arrive at this you will first have to make a plot ^ II 

1 bdy it by the sheet or the pad at your plan. Here you will naturally employ a smaller 

scale, the side of a square equalling perhaps 5 feet. 
a scale. A square on the paper to in- Besides putting the points of the compass where 
e foot" of house is handy. But if you they belong, indicate prevailing wind, sun, view 
s of two squares equal one foot, you and other orientation factors. So start with plot 
scale, and the furniture drawings on plan to decide on the general location of the rooms 
be traced and cut out so that you may in relation to sun, wind, view, street, etc. (See *,' 
3 your plans. "Quarter inch scale" diagram, left.) 

% inch measured on paper indicates Then at a larger scale ( 1 /q"=1 foot is good for 
actual house. these preliminary schematic plan sketches) begin 
er with refinements like thickness of with the living room, the room which will be the 
rchitectural expert can take care of all center of your lives, and fit the parts of the house 

to that. It is no more important than any other 

room, but it seizes the imagination, for it is the W- 

heart and holds the hearth. 

When you have a plan scheme that seems about 

right at this scale— draw it at quarter inch scale 

and arrange your furniture "cut-outs" on the plan. 

This will help locate doors and windows so there 
TTTTZ1 I~T 1 1 1 1 1 w '^ De wa ^- s P ace an ^ clearance space. Your final 






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working drawings and blue prints will be at this 
scale too. ("Cut-outs" are shown on page 10.) 

Turn to the check lists which will remind you of 
many planning features vital to the smooth run- 
ning of the whole house. 

Sketches show a plot plan and a rough house 
plan drawn on cross-section paper. They do not & 
include every last detail which will go into your 




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check, and in following a similar method you will 
be crystallizing your ideas in the logical way. 

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ABC's of planning . • • 



* 



* 



Your house is taking form. You have checked the 
Needs and Requirements List. You know the num- 
ber of rooms you will have, about where they will 
be, something about their size. Now you can get 
down to studying, whether your room layouts are 
going to work. The best way to discover this is by 
asking yourself what you will want to do in any one 
room, and then seeing whether you can do it as 
you've set it up. 

Front hall first. Can it be reached under cover 
from a car on rainy days? Does it prevent casual 
callers seeing all that goes on in the living room? 
Does it also prevent chilly drafts ? Does it have ade- 
quate closet accommodations where outer garments 
and overshoes can be put? Can the floor be freed of 
mud and dampness easily? Long halls are not only 
inconvenient, they're also expensive since the more 
compact the final plan, the shorter the outside walls. 

At times the living room is a place for entertain- 
ing. Can a group gather cozily around the fireplace, 
play games? Have you provided storage space for 
game equipment? Will a gathering of friends divide 
up naturally into friendly groups as your furniture 
is placed ? 

At other times the living room may mean a place 
for reading, sewing, doing homework, keeping 
house accounts. Is there place for the easy chairs, 
sofas, tables, desk, for doing these things? Room 
for armside tables? Well located outlets for the 
right lighting without interminable and entangling 
electric cords ? Have you ample shelf space for col- 
lections, if you're a family of hobbies ? Built-in cabi- 
nets for albums or phonograph records? 

The dining room is far less flexible and so less 
complicated to arrange, but it takes some doing. The 
big decision to make here is whether it will be an 
integral part of living room or kitchen, or a room of 
its own. Either way you won't want the dining room 
table any further from the range than need be and 
you must have china-linen-glass-silver storage areas 
handy. Be sure, too, that you leave adequate lanes 
for.serving. 



The kitchen has become a scientifically planned 
food preparation center, and so a delight to work in. 
Appliance manufacturers have engineered it to a 
state of wonderful exactness. Unless you have strong 
convictions about special features, the home owner 
cannot do better than to study the basic layouts they 
have evolved (see pages 16 and 17), designed to 
fit snugly into various shaped spaces. But you must 
decide where the laundry is to be done, and whether 
the basement will be handed over to the youngsters 
for entertaining, used as a workshop, or store room, 
or both. Where will you place your heating units? 

When you get to the bedrooms, be sure you leave 
ample, unbroken wall areas for bed heads, dressers 
and dressing tables. Do have enough free floor space 
for a slipper chair or two. Readers-in-bed will make 
sure of the electric outlets so that reading lamps can 
be just right. 

Have you left room in the bathroom for a gener- 
ous clothes hamper? Will the medicine chest be big 
enough for accumulating adhesive rolls and cough 
syrups ? Is the linen closet-near at hand ? Aire there 
outlets for your electric razor, the electric heater 
and such ? 

Take great pains in all rooms to see that light 
switches are placed where they seem handiest to you. 
Be sure steps are brightly lit for safety. Finally 
garner every inch you can for storage. Closets and 
store rooms can make all the difference between 
comfort and crowding. Closets designed and 
equipped for the things they will store save lots of 
space. 

In order that you may allow adequate space for 
various pieces of furniture, a page has been devoted 
to 1/4 inch scale diagrams from which you can trace 
cutouts. Dimensions are average, but many varia- 
tions in size do occur, so do not take these as final. 
Cut out the furniture diagrams from your tracings, 
making as many duplicates as you need. Then test 
the workings of your 1/4" scale plan by arranging 
the furniture cut-outs in the rooms. It is a good idea 
to fill out the check lists for each room first. 



Typical furniture pieces . . . 



L = LENGTH • D 



SCALE: Va" = 1-0" 
DEPTH • H = HEIGHT 



LIVING 
ROOM 



CLUB 
CHAIR 



L 2'-6" 
D 3'-0" 
H 3'-0" 






L 2'-3" 
D 2'-6" 
H 3'-0" 



L 2' -6" 
D 2'-6" 
H 3'0" 



FLAT TOP 
DESK 



L 4'-0" TO 6'-0" 
D 2'-0" TO 3'-0" 
H 2'-6" 



SIDE 
BRIDGE 
OR DESK 
L V-6" 
D I '-6" 
H 2'-6" 



GOVERNOR 
WINTHROP 
DESK 



L 2'-8" TO 3'-8" L 2'-8" TO 3'-8" 
D l'-6" TO 2'-0" D l'-6" TO 2'-0" 
H 6'-2" TO 7'-2" H 3'-6" 






L 2'-0" 
D l'-3" 

H 2'^0" 



L 1-8 
D l'-8" 

H 2'-0" 



L 2'-2" TO 3'-0 
D l'-8" TO 2'-0 
H V-6" 




LOVE SEAT 

6 



SMALL 
L 3'-6" 
D 2'-0" 
H 2'-3" 



LARGE 
L 4'-6" 
D 2'-6" 
H 3'-0" 




DRUM, 
PIECRUST 
TABLES 



DIAM. 2'-6" TO 3'-0" DIAM. 2'-4" TO 3'-0" DIAM. 2'-0" 

H I '-4" TO l'-8" H 2'-3" TO 2'-6" H 2'-l" TO 2 '-7" 



BREAK FRONT 



L 4'-0" TO 5'-0" 

D l'-6" 

H 6'-2" TO 7'-2" 



LOW BOY 



HIGH BOY 



L 2'-6" TO 2'-8" L 3'-0" TO 3'-6" 
D l'-6" TO l'-8" D l'-6" TO 2'-0" 
H 2'-4" TO 3'-2" H 5'-0" TO 7'-0" 




BABY GRAND 

L 5-6" 
D S'-O" 
H 3'- 4" 




GRAND PIANO 
L 5'-6" TO 9'-0" 
D 5'-0" 
H 3'-4" 



CONSOLE PIANO 

18 



L 5-0-D2-0"-H 4-5' 



MINIATURE PIANO 
L 4'-8" 
D \'-7" 
H 3'-0" 



OINI NJG 
TABLE 



DINING 
ROOM 




L l'-6" 
D l'-6" 
H 2'-6* 




I 2-0 
D 2'-0" 
H 2'-6" 



SERV-TABLE 

24 



L 2'-6" TO 3'-6" 
D l'-2" TO l'-9" 
H 2'-8" TO 3'-0" 



SIDE BOARD! I CHINA CAB. 



L 4'-0" TO 6'-6" 
D l'-5" TO 2'-l" 
H 3'-2" 



L 2'-8" TO 4'-0" 
D l'-2" TO 1'9" 
H 5'-2" TO 6'-2" 




3-0'x5'-0" 



L 3'-6" TO 8'-0* 
D 2'-6" TO 4'-0" 
H 2'-6" 

ROUND TABLES 
2'-7" TO 5'-9" DIAM. 



BEDROOM 



SINGLE 
BED 

L S-IO" 

D i-01Q3'-9' 



DOUBLE 
BED 

L S-IO 

D 4-S"T04 L lO" 





L l'-6" L 2'-0" TO 2'- 10" 
D l'-6" D 2'-0" TO 3'-2" 
H 2'-6" H 2'-6" 



DRESSER 



L 3'-0" TO 4'-0" 
D l'-6" TO 2'-0" 
H 2'- 10" TO 3'-l" 



CHEST OF 
DRAWERS 



L 2'-8" TO 3'-4" 
D V-6" TO l'-9" 
H 3'-8" TO 4'-8" 



-7 



L l'-2" TO 2'-0" 
D l'-2" TO 2'-0" 
H 2'-6" 



DRESSING 
TABLE 

36 



L 3'-0" TO 4'-0" 
D T-6" TO l'lO' 
H 2'-6" 



CHAISE LONGUE 



L 4'-0" TO 5'-6" 
D 2'-0" TO 2'-6" 
H 2'-6* 



10 



J 



hall or foyer 




The entrance hall of your home says, "Welcome". It gives 
the invaluable first impression. So don't let it be cramped, 
colorless, impersonal. Make it attractive as well as useful. 
The foyer affords privacy for the rooms beyond. It cuts off 
drafts. It usually has a closet where hats and coats, umbrellas 
and galoshes and such are kept. Even better, if your budget 
permits, there is a downstairs lavatory off it, with room for 
a dressing table and full length mirror. 

The foyer takes hard wear, people coming in out of all 
weathers. Plan a floor which can take it. Also, have the 
entrance well heated. 

The main trouble in making a successful entrance hall 
is that its walls must be broken by so many doors. Try to 
group these so that they are orderly. And save at least one 
length of wall for a chair or bench where anyone who must 



/c 



wait can be seated. Reserve space for a small but terribly 
useful table, for door chimes, for telephone stand. And 
plan the lighting with care. 

If it is humanly possible, devise the placing of your 
garage so it leads into your house, so you can get to the 
kitchen with packages without going outdoors. 

At the same time, weigh the advantages of an outside 
exit to your basement. 

The service entrance must be considered too, placed 
where it will be convenient for deliveries to be made but 
not so conspicuous that it will detract from the front 
entrance. At the side or the back is usually best. And near 
it you will need a neat concealed place for the recepticals 
for waste and garbage. Many an otherwise good looking 
house is unsightly because these things were not thought of. 



CHECK LIST 



THE MAIN ENTRANCE WILL BE TO THE NORTH fj SOUTH □ EAST Q WEST fj 

It will be entered from front Q side Q 

It will open into a hall Q living room Q foyer FT] 

There will be doors to the clothes closet fj living room □ dining room □ bed room □ study □ 

kitchen □ powder room □ 
Windows will be fixed □ casement [J double hung □ glass blocks □ 

Lighting will include, wall bracket fj ceiling fixture fj floor lamp Q- table lamp fj light in closet □ 
Electrical outlets, base plugs □ door chimes fj switch for outdoor flood lights fj telephone □ and switches fj 

the powder room will be entereo from the hall Q separate hall Q or from 

Windows will be fixed □ double hung [J casement Q glass blocks □ 

Lighting will be Ventilator fj 



the garage DOORS will be upward acting fj swinging fj folding Q sliding □ automatic control Q 
The garage will include space for workshop □ and additional storage Q 

SPECIAL NOTES 



HOME OWNERS CATALOGS 



11 



The living room . . . 



V'r 




1. Primary furniture is grouped closely about the fireplace. Piano 
is parallel to wall to provide maximum space in living room. 



1 his is the room where you will mostly live, the heart of 
your home. In it you, as a family, will work and play and 
entertain your friends. Don't copy Mrs. Charles' living 
room, even though you had a lovely time there. The Charles 
live for their music, have the main furniture group around 
the radio and piano. Your family delights, say, in games or 
outdoor living. Therefore an entirely different sort of room 
for living is going to suit you. 

But there is one practically universal living room feature 
you're bound to want. That is the fireplace, the hearth. If 
possible have it on a window-less wall, since competition 
with sunlight vitiates the friendly brightness of the fire. Be 
sure to have it where furniture drawn up around it is out 
of main traffic lanes. Allow for a place to store firewood 
neatly. Remember that your fire will keep you warm as well 
as content so consider building a heat circulating unit into 
the fireplace and chimney. 

In all parts of the room study your traffic problems as 



Scale of drawing in. feet 



v 



BAY WINDOW 



DINING AREA 




i 'FOLDING 
^♦PARTITION 
OR CURTAIN 



4- TO KITCHEN 



5i T r*Pt.«— OT1 



2. In all the suggested plans shown, bay or picture windows may 
be used as a focal point instead of the firepiace. 



3. This plan using non-parallef walls combines living-dining activ- 
ities and provide.) more than average storage space. 




4. Writing or study group at left, music or game group at right, 
and center primary group, for conversation, tea, relaxation, etc. 



5. Game-table group occupies almost the same floor area as a baby 
grand piano. Placement at an angle is intended for informal rooms. 



m 



rabidly as though you were a cop. There will be coming 
and going, of course, Lut if your living room degenerates 
into a passageway between front door ancj back, stairs and 
kitchen, terrace and dining room, it is a failure. One way 
to avoid this is to set doors which lead to other parts of the 
house as close to each other as practical, so that passers- 
through won't have to tour the whole room. 

Plan the living room size and shape to accommodate 
what you will do in this space: games, reading, viewing 
television, listening, talking, sewing, etc. In each case make 
room for a group so you can sit down together. If a window- 
wall is desired, plan for easy accessibility to outdoor areas. 
Also provide storage room for special purpose tables, port- 
folios, games and the rest. 

This sounds as though the living room were going to 
have to be enormous, but furniture groupings can be used 
for more than one purpose. Under-scaled rather than over- 
scaled pieces of furniture will help to consolidate space. 



Orderly arrangement is the real key to getting a lot of 
living from every square foot. It can be arrived at only by 
the most careful planning, the most searching discussion. 

Whether your room be small or large, it should look 
right, serene. This is achieved in part by having good pro- 
portions of length to width to height. Here your trained 
expert will know the answers. But to help you in rough 
planning, a room whose width is to its length as 3 to 4, 
or 4 to 5, is in good proportion and your expert will work 
out the proper ceiling height. 

On page 10 are scale plans of furniture you may want 
to have. The outline drawings are for you to trace and cut 
out and arrange on your plan, so that you can experiment 
with placement. They are scaled 1/4 ' ncn to the f°°t an ^ 
represent standard, though not invariable furniture sizes. 
Windows and doors do not appear on the plans shown, 
but heavy lines indicate best positions for unbroken walls 
in relation to furniture groupings. 



//^HECK U* T 



j Mark r •> 

V ^ from hall U . , n sliding U 1 

B—~ l ° '° e n *>»»* hung D »** D , ghts o 

S n floor lamps D telephone U holst Q 

Adequate electr.cal o Q othet _ ^ Q ^tel D seal5 Q 

The fireplace of stone U k screen Q cab ,„ets D p 

dtcul a,nguo C \ b00to s occasionllD dubO 

„ it W e furniture W lU-* deb ° hlits , (nurnberof) - end and coffee 
U " VP • .he living room tore cre taryD b00 ta dio D 
Adequatespace-^ ^^ de*C 1 tekv , s ,on set O 

straight Chans D ^ . grand Q 0t ^ ? - ^tf ■ page 19) 

Space «1« also be recurred for a g ^ Clos ets 

'other musrcal instruments ^ and sere U 



Dining room or area 

W;1I your dining room be a part of your living room, or 
separate? If it's part of the living room, an "L" plan will 
work well, the dining area curtained or divided off by 
sliding partitions or folding screens. This way, table setting 
or clearing may be shut off, or the area made part of the 
living room between meals. 

Wherever you do eat you will want: (a) adequate lanes 
for serving, (b) minimum distance between range and 
table, with serving surfaces between, (c) good, close-at- 
hand storage space for linens, silver, glass and china. 



Several dining room arrangements are shown in the 
sketches. Here serving lanes are of minimum width. Make 
them wider if you can. 

In your family conclaves, ask yourself whether the din- 
ing room will be used for more things than just meals. 
Will you play games on this table? Will the children study 
their lessons here? Watch your planning and lighting with 
the answers to these questions in mind. Make sure, too, 
that you've plenty of electric outlets for toaster, coffee 
maker and any other appliances you may be getting. Place 



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tcale ofdrawinp i/t feet 



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1. This is another example of the combined living-dining room 
Unit type cabinet is used for serving and storage— conventional 
pieces could be substituted 



2. Dining rooms with fireplaces have 
to be larger than minimum for the 
comfort of those seated at the fable. 
This is- a typical formal suite arrange- 
ment suitable only for a large house. 



*• 



these convenient to counter, serving table or sideboard 
where there is room to operate them efficiently. Inciden- 
tally, you must think ahead about furniture like buffets, 
cabinets and the like, and allow wall space enough so that 
they will fit. If space is limited, unit-type cabinets, which 
utilize every inch, are worth considering. 

Consider having a "pass cabinet" opening from kitchen 
or pantry into the dining area through which dishes and 
trays can be passed. Under the "pass cabinet" can be a 
counter to serve as breakfast or snack bar, saving no end 
of work. Work saving and step saving features are mighty 
important and now is the time to put them in your plans. 




3. Minimum dining room is 
shown here. A space of two 
feel is required on one side for 
the buffet. Three f eet addi- 
tional length is necessary if an 
extension table is used. 



22 22 




3-6" ,24 




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Vll 
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£ 22 28 


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TYPE. SEATS 2 


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26 



4. The kitchen would be to the right 
end of this plan Furniture is located 
on two walls only making it possible 
to use this scheme in a living-dining 
room layout. 



5. A iong narrow dining room results 
when wall oieces are at the ends, and on 
end entrance from the kitchen is needed. 
with wider doors from living room. 



6. Spaces smaller than the usual 
minimum can be utilized if unit 
•ype seats are ncluded, but seat- 
ing and fable-service comfort 
are sacrificed to some extent 



, ,i hniber consideration. 
Mark ■' t°V H 'T < or plans. 



Mark V 



)f O.K. for pi*"*- 






a BAST ° J^T£«a«»- kfa " " ,lD 



Dining 



rectang 



ularQ 



round Q 



Separation by folding p Size of table n benches Q 

^ *- £**£, D food o, beverage - □ ^ Q wa , n O 

Unit type f— ££ china dose, D uMeQ - ^ D q f d Q ^g ^ 

Space for ■ d ble hun g D hx f a ^ Electrical outlets for : per hime q 

^"tXo U— eatable p.ece C 



The kitchen . . . 



1 he lady of the house may well spend more time in her 
kitchen than any place else, so she will want it not only 
efficient, but also charming. 

You can have a kitchen as compact and ship-shape as the 
galley of a yacht if you want but the trend is toward more 
spacious kitchens rather than smaller, but with space that 
is useful as well as pleasant. An informal dining corner or 
snack-bar is not only convenient and time-saving but can 
be made colorful and gay. It would be useful too as a meal- 
planning "kitchen office" and a place for relaxing or read- 
ing while keeping an eye or ear on the pressure cooker. 
Here you can keep your cookbooks, recipe cards, records 
and perhaps a radio. 

One end of the kitchen can be divided off with a folding 
gate to make an easily watched play-area for the little tots. 
By careful planning the laundry with its labor saving ma- 
chines can be combined with the kitchen in such a way that 
one function will not interfere with the other. 

There are so many different ways of developing your 



kitchen into an efficient, attractive, interesting multi-pur- 
pose, room that they can only be suggested here. But there 
are a few principles for planning the food-preparation part 
of the kitchen that will save untold steps and time. 

For efficiency, it has been discovered that the best way 
to plan is by "use-areas." There are three: (1) for food 
storage, (2) for food preparation and clean-up and (3) for 
cooking and serving. Start at the service entrance, through 
which food enters your house and put (1) nearest to it. 
Thus the hamburgers and eggs will go directly into the 
refrigerator, vegetables into bins, staples into cabinets. 
Next comes (2), of which the focal center is the sink with 
drain boards, counters, cabinets and drawers for utensils. 
The last, (3), is furthest from the back door and nearest 
to the serving counter or pantry or dining room. 

Each of the three stages of meal making requires its own 
equipment, which will be grouped where it's needed. For 
instance, your spice assortment close by or over the stove, 
your vegetable brushes at the sink. You will be glad to have 
counters in all areas, a place to put your packages down 
by the door while you take off your hat, a place to put the 
eggs and bacon while you fish the toast out of the toaster. 

Much equipment goes in cabinets and drawers under 
and over the counters. Plan their placement with a wom- 
an's height and arm-reach in mind. See, too, that you allow 





* 



An efficient plan having three adjoining walls; refrigerator (1) and 
cabinets for staples are near the back door. On the next wall are 
sink and counters (2) for cleaning and preparing the food for cook- 
ing. The third working wall takes the range (3) and serving space. 



A kitchen plan for a space where there are only two adjoining 
walls free for equipment. The sequence of operations is still the 
same: Store, Prepare, Cook, Serve, Clean Up, Put Away. Break- 
fast table may be installed on one of the two remaining walls. 



> 



* 



plenty of clearance for working comfortably between coun- 
ter top and cabinet bottom. 

Have permanent, long wearing counter tops installed at 
the time you build your kitchen, with one where cutting 
with a sharp knife will not leave irreparable scratches. 
A big window not only lets in plenty of light, but also 
makes the kitchen cheerful. Here you may grow herbs, as 
well. Many a family is finding that the cost of a picture 
window is. well justified in the kitchen. Lighting and elec- 
trical outlets must be planned thoughtfully to insure effi- 
ciency. Plan, too, for ventilating devices that will not only 
keep the kitchen cooler but will keep odors from straying 
through the house. 

There are three typical successful kitchen plans shown 
here. Each is step saving, logical in arrangement. No one 
is better than the others. Choose according to the space 
you have and your own preference, deciding by imagining 
yourself getting a meal in any one of the three and so 
discovering which works best for you. 

Before final plans of the kitchen can be made you will 
have to make your selections of equipment to be sure that 
they will all fit together along the walls. The manufacturers 
catalogs deserve your careful study for sizes, styles, and 
ideas or suggestions for efficient arrangement before you 
make up your mind. 



/ 




This kitchen has work areas on the facing walls, but as always, the 
three main steps of meal getting progress from back door to din- 
ing room door. This plan is compact and convenient, but does not 
allow for a breakfast table or other furniture, such as a work desk. 



CHECK LIST 



Mark ? for further consider****. Mark * if O.K. for plan, 
KITCHEN ON THE NORTH Q SOU ™ □ 

east □ west □ side of the house 

doors into it from the service entrance Q g ara S e □ 

back stairs Q basement □ dining r °° m D 

hall Q livin S room D mald ' S r °° m D 

pantry □ laundry Q 

WINDOWS: casement Q double hung Q nxed □ 

sliding Q glass block □ 

ELECTRICAL LIGHTING OUTLETS FOR: 

ceiling fixture Q li S hts undcr Wal1 ^^ D 
over sink □ over range Q 

other work centers 

automatic cupboard lights Q 

electrical outlets FOR range Q refrigerator Q 
freezer Q toaster Q mixers and extractors □ 
coffee maker D waffle iron Q plate warmer Q 
washing machine Q mangle or ironer Q i ron □ 
telephone Q clock \J radio Q 
entrance call signals Q pilot switch to basement Q 
other equipment 

KITCHEN UNITS WILL INCLUDE: 

sink: double □ single □ 

combined sink and laundry tray Q cupboards Q 

cabinets Q drop table D ironing board Q 

cleaning equipment closet Q storage □ 

MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT 

dishwasher Q garbage disposer Q 

range: electric Q gas Q coal Q oil □ 

water heater: electric D gas □ coal D oil Q 

ventilators D refrigerator: gas D ^ ctric □ 

food freezer Q incinerator □ 



The laundry . . . 



The amount of laundry equipment you can fit into a 
kitchen may prove inadequate and the collisions between 
washing and cooking on laundry day would be incon- 
venient. Also the resale value of your house probably will 
be greater if you have a separate laundry. So include it in 
your plans from the first if you can. It can also be the 
sewing room where clothes are mended before they're 
ironed. 

Today's best laundries have four main pieces of equip- 
ment: The washing machine, the clothes dryer, the ironer 
or mangle and the ironing board. Add to these a hamper 
into which the soiled linen chute empties, a sorting table 
or counter, cabinets for supplies, a hot plate for boiling 
linens and making starch, and you can see that you'll need 
plenty of room, neatly planned. 



Where laundry planning calls for clearest thinking is 
in its wiring. In the first place, it must obviously be flooded 
with revealing but not glaring light. What is more, local- 
ized lights should make it possible to examine clothes with 
an eagle eye at all stages. It is almost axiomatic that the 
laundry walls be light in tone to reflect light well. 

Equipment should be arranged in sequence, as kitchen 
equipment is. First hamper, work table for sorting (and 
possibly bins for temporary storage), also supply cabinets. 
Next, laundry trays and washing machine. The dryer and 
ironer may be on either the adjoining or the opposite wall. 
Leave room nearby for a clothes basket for the finished 
products. 

The layout plan and perspective indicate proper spacing 
of equipment to give you enough elbow room. Don't crowd 
more equipment into an equal space. The plan drawing 
shows arrows to indicate travel. By this arrangement you 
may dry clothes indoors with a gas or electric unit, or out- 
doors, weather permitting. 



t/os. 



2>rye 



Act pl&fe 
.TO DRYING ' fc DRYING 

<""y™ V* *\ 




Where a separate room is provided, 
the laundry at left would be ideal. 
The dotted line indicates the course 
of travel while doing the laundry 
work. 



The cpmbined kitchen-laundry-sew- ^ 
ing room at right shows a possible V 
multi-purpose arrangement. The 
laundry end could be closed off 
with a gate and used as a play area. 





v> 



CHECK LIST 

the laundry will be located on the first floor fj basement rj 

It will serve a dual purpose as sewing room \~\ children's play room FJ] game room rj| 
windows: casement Q double hung r_] fixed Q sliding fj glass block Q 
lighting: ceiling fixture fj strip lighting fj wall brackets fj] 
electrical outlets FOR: electric clock rj floor and table lamps □ hot plate rj iron Q ironer fj dryer fj 

food freezer f_ ventilator |~| 
equipment will include: sink Q laundry tubs rj ironer rj washing machine f_J dryer rj gas fj electric Q 

hot plate r_~) gas Q electric Q ventilator Q 
built-in units will include: cabinets rj supply shelves □ drying racks Q clothes chute fj 

hamper for storing and sorting clothes fj ironing board fj work tops for sorting and sprinkling fj 



Closets . . . 



Closet strategy has become as scientifically perfect as 
kitchen strategy, and wonderful equipment is available to 
heighten its effectiveness: racks, bars, sliding trays, etc. 
Still the gear of any one family is complicated and bulky, 
sp do a lot of figuring before you write O. K. on your closet 
plans. 

The standard depth for a closet is 2 feet. Three feet of 
width is a minimum allowance for one person's clothes. 
It is scanty, when you take into account summer moth 
bags, winter furs and the undesirability of sandwiching 
well-pressed woolens in too close. In any case, add 25 per 
cent to any space allowance you think right, as a margin 
of safety. You'll be glad for it. 

To get the most from every inch of storage space, have 
your closet doors the full width of the closet. If they slide, 



they won't eat up space in your rooms. Light the interior 
so that floor and shelves and hanging sections are bright. 
Paint or paper in a light color. Be sure walls are well fin- 
ished, floors meticulously laid. Moths thrive in cracks. 
Full-length mirrors may be installed to advantage on the 
inside of hinged closet doors, since being able to move a 
mirror gives greatest visibility. 

Pull-out bins or trays add immeasurably to the ease of 
keeping the linen closet orderly. They are grand, too, for 
storing off-season hats, sport shoes and the like. Install 
clothes rods for children's closets low enough so the young 
can reach them. A well-arranged closet may develop orderly 
habits in a child. Anyway it's worth trying. 

It is not enough to merely supply closet space, the space 
must be planned to take each and every item you can think 
of, must be divided and supplied with the necessary rods, 
shelves, bins, drawers, holders and compartments, etc., 
fitted to use all the space to its maximum— literally a place 
for everything, predetermined. 



* 




4 



This hall closet uses numer- 
ous fixtures to get the maximum 
storage capacity. Such fixtures 
always help to keep the closet 
neat and orderly. 

This closet has been shown with 
one set of doors removed in 
order to illustrate how the space 
has been divided. Sliding or 
hinged doors may be used. 




/< 



M 



CHECK. LIST (See also check lists of other rooms) 

SPECIAL STORAGE (where possible, give amount of space 
required) l 

Screens and storm sash and doors stored where? 

Awnings stored in 

Trunks and cases: number stored in 

Sewing machine stored in 

Outdoor drying equipment stored in 

Porch and terrace furniture stored in 

Sleds, toboggans, canoes stored in 

Bicycles, velocipedes, scooters stored in 

Baby carriage, perambulator, etc. stored in 

Garden tools stored in 



Surplus goods (unused furniture, books, etc.) stored in 
Special goods (guns, tents, sails, etc.) stored in 

Game equipment: card tables stored in 

folding chairs stored in 

other bulky units stored in 

Toy closets (list large toys requiring special storage space, 

and where stored ) 

Beverages stored in 

Food freezer and storage in 



HOME OWNERS CATALOGS 



19 



Bedrooms . . . 



There's an oft' forgotten element to take into account 
when you get to figuring out your bedrooms— the element 
of noise. Are trucks going to pound down your street in 
the witching hour? Are growing youngsters going to joggle 
in jive in the living room while you toss upstairs? Then 
study the room placing, arrangement and materials. 

The master bedroom should be as cjuiet as may be and 
yet, paradoxically, should command quick entry to the 
nursery. If your family is growing, your children entertain- 
ing friends, you may be glad if you allow enough space so 
your room can be a bed-sitting room on occasion. This 
means a good-sized room. Beds are big. Add to their own 
length and width, space so you can get to both sides of 
them when you make them up. It saves a deal of trouble. 
Allow for bedside tables or units big enough for individual 
lamps, clocks, books and general impedimenta. 



Leave nothing to chance when you plan bedroom wall 
space. Know to the inch the width of the beds you mean 
to use and leave ample wall space for them. Don't have 
windows so close as to keep you in icy drafts all winter long, 
or windows at the foot which will bathe you in the full 
blaze of the rising sun. On the other hand, do try to con- 
trive cross ventilation for steaming nights, and general 
brightness for days you spend in bed getting over grippe. 

Traffic lanes should be calculated as accurately in the 
bedroom as in the dining room. You will want free, un- 
blocked access to your closet. If your dressing table cannot 
be incorporated in your bathroom, it belongs near your 
closet. 

Increasingly parents are planning children's rooms which 
grow with the children. From a nursery the room becomes 
a study, then living room of one's own. It is wonderful for 
your children to be able to have overnight guests, and 
where room is at a premium, this is feasible with double- 
decker beds. 

In using the check list with your sketch plans, identify 
each bedroom first by a letter. Then study each room. 
Finish checking each room before going on to the next. 




A very nearly square room often per- 
mits greater freedom of movement 
and more convenient arrangement. 



With the chair at left of unit cabinets the 
entire right end of the room could be lined 
with wardrobe closets. 



This bedroom is large enough to permit addi- 
tional pieces of furniture, including a chaise 
longue. Numbers refer to furniture chart. 



t* 



tfj 



<►"'■ 




Mark ? for further consideration. Mark i* if O.K. for plans. 



DESIGNATE ON PLAN 

TO BE Jc 
OCCUPIED BY' 






exposure: 

North 


A 


B 


c 


D 


E 


F 


South 














East 














West 














DOORS FROM: 

Hall 














Private bath 














Other bathroom 

Shared bath 














Sleeping porch 














windows: 

Casement 














Double hung 














Cross ventilation 














TYPE AND ARRANGEMENT 
OF LIGHTING: 

Ceiling light 














Floor lamps 














Table lamps 














Wall brackets 














ELECTRICAL OUTLETS: 

Bed light 














Call bell 














Dresser light 














Electric clock 














Door switch for closets 














Nieht light 














Outside floor lights 














Radio 














Switch for hall 














Telephone 














Vanity mirror 














BUILT-IN: 

Bed 














Bunk 














Clothes closet 














Double-deck bunks 














Dresser 














Folding bed 














Mirror 














Shoe racks 














Vanity 














Wardrobe 















FURNITURE PROVISIONS: 

Bed or beds 

Bedside table and lamp. 

Bookcase 

Cedar chest 

Chaise longue 

Chest of drawers 

Child's play pen 

Crib 

Day bed or couch 

Desk and chair 

Dresser 

Dressing table 

Easy chair 

Floor lamp 

Radio 

Slipper chair 

Study table 



B C D E F 






Dressing Rootrn 

DOOR FROM: 

Bedroom 














Bath 














Hall. 














WINDOWS: 

Casement 














Double hung 














LIGHTING: 

Ceiling light 














Closet light 














Lamps 














Wall brackets 














BUILT-IN: 

Closets 














Dresser 














Vanity 














Wardrobe 














Mirror 














DUAL USE AS: 

Boudoir 














Sewing room 














Storage room 














Study 














SPECIAL FURNITURE: 

(List) 






































































































21 



Plumbing 

and sanitation . . 



Even for a small family, two bathrooms are mighty con- 
venient and more are better. By placing baths side by side, 
or directly under one another, they can be made to cost 
less than if they are far flung, since this way the same 
piping will supply and drain both sets of fixtures. You can 
even, by thrifty figuring, get two bathrooms out of one, as 
the sketch below shows. Only cost is for a partition and 
one extra fixture, whereas the usefulness of the area is 

almost doubled. 

A big bathroom is a delight, but actually a small one can 



be nearly as serviceable. Don't let it get smaller than 7 
feet by 5y 2 , and 10 by 5y 2 is much more comfortable. 
One justification for enlarging your own bathroom is so 
that you can install cupboards, shelves and dressing table, 
reducing crowding in bedroom and closets. 

Be sure your bathrom is as nearly waterproof as possible. 
Even if you don't let the tub splash over, condensation 
will dampen walls and floor. Special wall and floor surfaces, 
manufactured for the purpose, are not only efficient, but 
many of them are truly beautiful. Any upped original cost 
for installing them will be amortized by the repairs they 
will save you. 

If economy has to be practiced, be sure that it does not 
affect the selection of your pipes. Here the very best is the 
only possible quality to select. Local water conditions 
govern the selection of the kind of pipe that will last long- 
est where you are going to build. A plumber is a very 






toilet 

com pa r tm en t 



SatAcny 
compartment 




jfdouSle tavatory 
and/nate-up counter 7 

-c/oset for towets 
V anct to/tet art/ctes 




Where a tub is to be used, this bathroom 
is the absolute minimum. Note that none 
of the fixtures has been located under 
the window. 




If a shower is to be used, the minimum 
width may be four feet six inches. Any 
bathroom smaller than this will be 
inadequate. 



expensive guest. A water conditioner where water needs 
treatment, will help to preserve your pipes, to say nothing 
of your skin and your disposition. 

Bathroom planning is mechanically simple, since fix- 
tures are generally standard sizes. Look out for windows 
over bath tubs, drafty for the bather and hard to open and 
close. Provide more medicine cabinet space than you think 
you'll ever need and you'll be the envy of your friends. 
Additional shallow shelves over the tub are good for soap, 
bath cosmetics, brushes and such. A woman will be glad 
of a drying rack for stockings and undies. 

Many men like showers. The tub-shower combination 
is always useful. If possible fit in both a separate shower 
stall and a tub. In the country or suburban house, a down- 
stairs shower stall is grand, gardeners, golfers and small fry 
will use it avidly and wear and tear on the house will be 
reduced all along the line. If you must pump your own 



water, pick a shower head which throws a good but con- 
centrated spray as this kind uses water remarkably spar- 
ingly, but supplies a fine bath. 

You can go as far as you like, or can afford, in making 
your bathroom a complete and up-to-date contributor to 
health, beauty and a sense of well being. There are numer- 
ous worthwhile accessories. Bathroom scales will help keep 
track of your avoirdupois and the children's growth. An 
electric radiant heater will be welcome in brisk fall days 
before general heating is on. A dental lavatory will save 
congestion and fuss. You can build in or provide space for 
a sun lamp too. 

Don't forget you will need an adequate water supply out- 
side the house as well as in, so locate "hose-bibs" (at least 
two) for your garden hose and select water pipes of a 
proper size. And a faucet in the garage, and a floor drain 
there too for car washing in winter. 



\f CHECK UST 



Mark ?1or further consideration. 

M<»k V H O.K. for />/*«<• 




TO BE 
USED BY 



ENTRANCE FROM: 

Bedroom 

Dressing room 

Hall 

Two bedrooms 

built in : 

Clothes chute 

Clothes hamper 

Drying rack 

Linen closet 

Medicine cabinet ... 

Towel closet 

fixtures: 

Bathroom scales 

Bathtub 

Cabinet 

Dental lavatory 




fixtures: (continued) 

lavatory: Corner 

Pedestal 

Wall 

Mirrors... 

Separate shower 

Shower over tub 

Watlrcloset in bathroom. 

In separate compartment- 

lighting: 

Ceiling --; 

Medicine cabinet 

Strip lighting; .--- 

Shower stall light 

Wall brackets 

ELECTRICAL OUTLETS: 

Glow heater 

Hair dryer 

Razor 

Sun lamp 

Ventilator 

Vibrator 

windows: 

Casement 

Double hung 

Glass block 

Sliding 




Heating and 
air-conditioning . . . 



lour heating system should give you the heat you want, 
efficiently, dependably, economically, and as automatically 
as possible. It ought to be up to the worst winter weather. 
Aid and abet it by insulating your house well, and by get- 
ting as much supplemental warmth as you can from the 
sun through double-glazed windows. 

The three best-known ways of heating your house are 
by hot water, steam or warm air. No one is best for every 
home, but one may be the best for your locality and your 
type of house. Each one of the three systems mentioned 
can be either a gravity or forced circulation system. The 



latter steps up the efficiency of heating systems. Circula- 
tion is forced, where hot water is the heating medium, by 
a circulating water pump; for warm air it is a fan arrange- 
ment, and with steam, vacuum valves do the trick. One of 
the main reasons why forced circulation is desirable is be- 
cause it gives results so quickly when automatic controls 
switch on the heat. Besides this the units in your room, 
like radiators, convectors and ducts, can be smaller with 
a forced circulation system. Result, more clear wall space 
for furniture and a better looking room all around. The 
drawing below show various ways of heating your rooms. 
Heating systems have been improved beyond belief in 
recent years and one of the greatest steps forward is in the 
manufacture of heating controls. The most ingenious of 
these are automatic, will supply you with the temperature 
you need for as long as you like, will switch on or off at 
the hour and temperature you select. What this means on 



. /■ 

. 1 

■ ■■'■" j 


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5^2 ii|j 


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a^lillw 



Radiators are one of the commonest means of trans- 
ferring heat from the boiler to the air of the room. 
Water or steam flows through the radiator and 
heat is given off by convection and radiation in 
the room. It is always well therefore to leave 
enough space around the radiator to permit air to 
circulate freely, A heat reflecting surface behind 
the radiator adds to its efficiency. 



conveci 
enclosure 




Convectors, usually thinner than radiators, may be 
installed in the wall, leaving only an opening at 
the top and bottom for the circulation of air. 



will 



\\duct 



The grill opening shown above might be the room 
supply or exhaust for a warm-air system or an air- 
conditioning system. Grills can also be located in 
the floor. 



a snowy morning, only an old-time commuter can realize. 

Hand in hand with heating goes its obverse, air condi- 
tioning. But with a simple forced air heating system, you 
may be able to achieve partial cooling, for this equipment 
is capable of circulating cooler basement or night air 
through your rooms. Individual room air conditioners serve 
special purposes, such as making one or two rooms 'com- 
fortable. An attic fan properly installed is a good cooler too. 
Complete year round air conditioning does more,— tech- 
nically it takes moisture out of the air, as well as cooling 
it in summer, puts moisture in and warms it in winter, 
niters the air the year round. Whatever system you use to 
achieve heating and cooling, it will work the better for a 
sound insulation job throughout your house. 

Study the literature of the manufacturers in this catalog 
to get an insight into modern equipment and how it works. 
Find out about the availability of fuel and service in your 



neighborhood. Then go ahead with the best quality units 
which you can afford, and insure their efficiency by pro- 
viding insulation, weather stripping and double window 
glazing. 

Heating and air conditioning are highly technical sub- 
jects and the layout of the system should be left in the 
hands of a reliable expert who is familiar with all the engi- 
neering data, one who has had experience in the field and 
can properly design the kind of system best suited to your 
particular plan and type of house. Tell him what you want, 
he'll do the rest. 



K 



CHECK UST 



floor $lah 



pipe coils 

or 

alp ducts 

Panel healing uses pipe coils or airducts running 
through the ceiling, floor, or wall in order to pro- 
vide radiant heat in the rooms. Any of the three 
heating mediums, air, steam or water may be used. 



r con tin uous m eta t 
\base panets s 



basement T~\ on th 

U °" fbe ground floor n 

. — E hot a 

/et warm air pi v U 

P a ne/ heat.W n a por Q warm air pi 

in s(J gravity n f~ ^ 

fuel- ,. .- * YO forced c '*uIario n n 

lc U bituminous p] 

*F SOLID FUEL D «***'"% Q 

provide automar.V f, ■ 

p KOV, S , ONFOR mahCfir ^eq Uj>rnemD 

automatic confw 
^^c A ,ou TLETsforaJJ COntr0, ^'P^D 
complete a» e S"<pment Q 

**'" operate on g as Q 
electricity Q oil Q 
a-r filtering Q cooJ - 
humidifier n a l 

WIT COOLERS for 
■WMI.W* r °° mS '" SUmmer 



This new radiant heating unit appears to be a con- 
tinuous baseboard, and isn't much larger, but its 
long coils act as a radiator. Steam or hot water 
is used. 



Electricity and lighting . . . 



1 he number and placement of electrical outlets is of the 
greatest importance. You will want a number of lamps and 
you will not want to live in a tangle of long electrical cords. 
Better to have too many convenience outlets than too few, 
you may want to change your furniture arrangements 
someday. If you are in doubt as to how you will arrange 
your furniture, put enough outlets on all walls so you can 
make shifts without sliding out of range of outlets, sources 
of light. 

Lighting itself has become an exact science in recent 
years, the emphasis not on increasing light intensity willy- 
nilly, but on achieving just the right amount and kind for 
each and every task or purpose. The elimination of trying 
glare has been studied as intensively as the amount of light 
sufficient to make the finest work no strain on your eyes. 

Causes of eye strain (which in turn leads to fatigue and 
all sorts of physical disorders) seem to be: insufficient light, 
glare, unduly sharp brightness contrasts. A spottily lighted 
room may be exciting to look at, but definitely dangerous 
for the eyes. Bright, individual lights should be no more 
than ten times as bright as the general, over-all room light. 
In other words, don't settle down under one reading lamp, 
at night, with the rest of the room in darkness. Supplement 
your local lighting with general illumination. 

Used in combination or separately, there are three kinds 
of lighting to be considered: 

Direct. This is concentrated illumination for reading, 
writing or delicate, exacting work, directed where you want 
it, usually from your shaded lamps. See that it supplies 
ample intensity for the job in hand without glare. 

Indirect, as the name implies, involves light thrown onto 
a large area, generally the ceiling, and reflected back from 



it, to spread diffused light throughout. It is provided by 
special fixtures, coves or reflectors. 

Semi-Indirect. Light is directed both upward and down, 
so that some is direct, some reflected. 

In addition to any scientific knowledge which you can 
bring to bear in planning the lighting of your home, the 
main tool which you have is good common sense. It will 
tell you to see that stairs are well lighted, that hall lights 
are controlled by switches both upstairs and down, that 
you get soft general lighting in your dining room, that good 
direct lights are close to the. chair where you will read or 
sew, that local lights illumine each kitchen task, and so on. 
And don't forget lights outside, either. 

And while you are thinking of where each lighting fixture 
or outlet should be in relation to each activity and piece 
of furniture in each room, be sure the wiring is adequate, 
yes generous, for both lighting and appliances and for 
power. Now is the time to provide at least cost the wiring 
outlets for all the labor-saving and convenience items that 
you win need and want —washer, ironer. radios, television, 
refrigerator, freezing unit, range, fans, motors, room heat- 
ers, and power for your oil burner or stoker and all the rest. 
This means plenty of outlets, properly arranged circuits 
and wire sizes large enough to carry the present and future 
loads. 

Switches should be located so you can reach them natu- 
rally as you enter or leave a room or space, lighting your 
way before you. A pilot light at the cellar switch will show 
you whether the light is on or off down there. And have 
one for the attic too. Be sure your circuit-breaker or fuse- 
box is in a handy location for you will want to be able to 
get at it in the dark if something goes wrong. 



ce LLtn, 



continuous 
CCofbt $ource_ 




ceicirii 

continuous 
oichtsourc 



vafance- 
curta ivb 
vein cl — 



built- in 
Cickt 
P&net! " 



mirrors 




ft a U 



1. Continuous uniform lighting for any 
room may be secured by using fluores- 
cent incandescent or cold cathode tubu- 
lar lamps hidden in a cove or molding. 



2. Tubular lights behind a valence may 
be used to accent windows or objects. It 
is also an interesting way of providing 
general illumination. 



3. Built-in light panels around mirrors are 
always helpful. Such a unit as shown 
above might be installed in a bed room 
between two closets— over a vanity. 



Lawn and landscaping . . . 



Lrike every other facility that goes to make up your new 
home, the lawn surrounding it should be planned now for 
its full enjoyment when it becomes a reality. 

Without a lawn even the best landscaping is meaning- 
less. Actually, the grass is an integral part of the landscap- 
ing, without which your home will look as naked as an 
unfurnished room. 

Perhaps the best way to lay plans for a dream lawn is 
to list certain considerations. This list, while not conclusive, 
will start you on the right track to a fine lawn with a 
minimum of lost motion and costly mistakes: 

1. Survey property to determine the amount of natural 
slope and to locate existing drainage facilities. 

2. Begin early 'to reserve topsoil of suitable quantity and 
quality. 

3. Save all topsoil before building excavation starts. 

4. Plan the preparation so that the actual seeding can be 
accomplished during the late summer or early fall season. 

5. Sow a quality seed mixture that has done well on other 
successful lawns in your locality and a mixture that is 
adapted to the area as far as direct sunshine or shade 
are concerned. 

6. Don't plant a new lawn on subsoil. 

7. Don't plant lawn seed without fertilizing the seed bed 

It is a truly rare occasion when a good lawn "happens" 
to result from a hasty, improperly executed and poorly 
timed planting. The outstanding lawns the country over 
are planned from the beginning. It makes little difference 
whether the lawn consists of acres of restful vistas or an 
outdoor carpet serving double for a croquet court in front 
of the barbecue furnace, planning its start will pay off well 
through many years of good, attractive service. 

From the moment you start considering your plans for 
a new home, you should be developing your landscaping 
ideas, too. Before you start construction of your home, there 
are many landscaping factors that should be considered in 
light of your lot and its characteristics, neighboring lots, 
sun and shade patterns, maintenance and family activities. 

Actually, there are three steps to be taken when it comes 
to landscaping. First, make your plans reflect the best pos- 
sible use of the land as far as practicality and beauty are 
concerned. Second, put your plan to work and shape the 
land by retaining natural advantages and constructing nec- 
essary walls, pathways and driveways. Finally, select the 
plants that will make your landscaping plans come to life. 

There are four general areas to think about— street, util- 
ity, garden and family areas. 

The approach to your house— the so-called street area- 
is the area the public sees first. When deciding upon plant- 
ings for this area, consider their attractiveness and the 
visibility they permit. 

You'll want plenty of outdoor living space if you're like 
most modern home-planners ! This is the private area which 
could very well include a porch or terrace and a play-yard. 
Plus plenty of space for outdoor living and sun-bathing! 



A garden area is a must for garden enthusiasts. No matter 
whether it's a flower or vegetable garden for you, chances 
are your garden will be a sun-worshiper— place your gar- 
den accordingly. And place your garden where the most 
people will enjoy it most of the time. 

Your service area should be close to the driveway and 
walks. Among the items you will want to consider for this 
part of your land are clothes drying and waste collecting 
facilities. 

There are so many trees, bushes, vines and perennials 
from which to choose! Better make certain you round up 
all the professional advice you can before you start planting. 

Briefly stated, there are certain fundamentals to follow 
in making a selection of plants: 



(a) Consider the outline of the plant— its size and shape 
and how fast it grows. 

(b) Consider the sun and the shade in the selected loca- 
tion. 

(c) Consider the plant's color and its flowers and fruit. 

(d) Consider the hardiness and permanence of the plant. 

(e) And consider the soil and moisture requirements. 



HOME OWNERS' CATALOGS 




Product selector . . . 



The list on this and the following pages will enable 
you to make a permanent record of your selections of all 
the various items you will want in your house, designated 
by the specific producer's name and brand. In the column 
headed "kind or material" write in the type, or material 
of which any item is made. The trade name goes next, 
and the manufacturer's or firm's name in the last column, 

using the information you have found in your thorough 
study of the manufacturers' catalogs section of this vol- 
ume. Make plenty of notes as you go through. 



In the first section of this material and equipment list 
the roorris have been taken up individually room by room. 
Several blank lines have been left under each major item; 
i.e., walls, ceilings, floors, etc. The "reminder" (below) 
is arranged alphabetically, suggests types, kinds, materials 
and finishes which may be written in these blanks. You 
fill in the brand name and manufacturer's name. The 
example below shows how the first line of the check list 
might have been written. 



r*? 




r 



walls: 


Fabric 


Glass 


Linoleum 


Metal 


Paint 


Plaster 


Piaster base 


Plywood 


Tile 


Wall board 


Wallpaper 


Wood paneling 


FLOOR: 


Asphalt tile 


Carpet 


Concrete 



{Go over this. list when considering each room as it will suggest materials, types, etc.) 



Cork 


Fixed 


Linoleum 


Glass block 


Paint, Varnish, 


Rolling screens 


etc. 


Screens 


Rubber 


Sliding 


Rug anchors and 


Storm sash 


pads 


Venetian blinds 


Rugs 


Weather stripping 


Stone 


Window shades 


Tile 




Wood 


LIGHTING FIXTURES 




Ceiling 


INDOWS: 


Cove or recessed 


Casement 


Fluorescent 


Curtain hardware 


Strip 


Drapery hardware 


Spot light 


Double glazed 


Ultra-violet 


Double hung 


Wall bracket 



HARDWARE: 


Unit heaters 


Cabinet 


Unit cooler 


Door 


Vanity 


Window 


Ventilator 


Other 


Window seats 




DOORS: 


BUILT-IN UNITS: 


Dutch 


Bookcases 


Flush 


Cabinets 


French 


Closet equipment 


Panelled 


Cupboards 


COMMUNICATION: 


Damper 


Alarm systems 


Dresser 


Call bells 


Fireplace mantel 


Chimes 


Fireplace circulating 


Intercommunicating 


unit 


Radio 


Heat controls 


Telephone 


Radiator covers 


Television 



LIVING ROOM 



Walls and Ceilings 


Kind or Material 


Brand 


Manufacturer or Firm 












- 


Floor 








Doors 








Windows 








Hardware 








Lighting Fixtures 
















Built-in Units 
















Communication 
















Furniture 








DINING ROOM 

Walls and Ceilings 












— 





28 



Home Owners' product se 



r 



: 



c 



DINING ROOM (Cont'd) 



Floor 


Kind or Material 


Brand 


Manufacturer or Firm 


Doors 








Windows 








Hardware 








Lighting Fixtures 
















Built-in Units 
















Communication 
















Furniture 




. 





KITCHEN 

Walls and Ceilings. 



Floor 

Doors 

Windows 

Ha rd wa re 

Lighting Fixtures. 



Built-in Units— Accessories and Equipment 

Cabinets . 



Counter Tops- 

Dishwasher 

Drainboards- 



Food Freezer 

Garbage Disposer- 

Incinerato r 

Range 



Refrigerator- 
Sinks 



Ventilator- 



Other Appliances- 



Communication 



LAUNDRY 

Walls and Ceilings. 



Floor 

Doors 

Windows 

Hardware 

Lighting Fixtures. 



Built-in Units — Accessories and Equipment 

Cabin ets . 

Tiryp. r 



Hot Plate 

Ironer 

Mangle 

Sinks 

Tubs 



Ventilator- 



Washing Machine- 
Other Appliances^ 



HOME OWNERS' CATALOGS 



29 



oduct selector 



BEDROOMS (Name) 

{Repeat on separate sheet jor each bedroom if necessary) 



Walls and Ceilings 



Floor 

Doors 

Windows_ 
Hardware 



Lighting Fixtures 



Built-in Units. 



Kind or Material 



Brand 



Communication 

Furniture . 

BATHROOM (Repeat on separate sheet Jor each bath or lavatory if necessary) 
Walls and Ceilings 



Manufacturer or Firm 






Floor 

Doors 

Windows 

Hardware 

Lighting Fixtures. 



Built-in Units— Accessories and Equipment 

Brush and glass holder 

Dental Lavatory 

Hair Dryer 

Hamper 



Lavatories 

Medicine Cabinets^ 
M irro rs 



Shoiver Cabinet 

Shower Controls 

Soap Dish 

Toilet Paper Fixture 

Towel Racks 

Tub Hanger 

Tub 

Unit Heater 

Ventilator 

Water Closet 



Note: Make similar lists for each room including game room, basement, study, sun room, 
garage, dark room, hobby room, utility room, etc. 
MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT 
Heating and Air Conditioning 



p 



Air Conditioning 

Air Filters 

Attic Fan 

Automatic Controls^ 

Boiler 

Circulating System- 
Con vectors 



Cooling Equipment 

Dehum idijier 

Fireplace Heater 

Fu rna ce 

Gas Burner 



Hot Water Heater- 
Humidifier 

Oil Burner., 



- 



30 



Home Owners' product se 



MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT— Heating and Air Conditioning (Cont'd) 

Kind or Material Brand 



Radiators 

Radiator Enclosures^ 

Space Heater 

Stoker 

Valves 

Ventilating Fans 



Warm Air Grills and Registers- 
Electricity and Lighting 

Alarm Systems 



Circuit Breakers. 

Door Chimes 

Floodlighting 

Fuse Boxes 



Lightning Rods 

Radio and Television- 
\\ r/ iring System 



Plumbing and Sanitation 

Cold Water Pipe 

Copper Tubing 

Floor Drains 



Grease Traps 

Hot Water Pipe 

Hot Water Tank 

Lawn Sprinkling System. 

Mixing Valves 

PumpS- 



Septic System- 
Soil Pipe 

Sump Pump- 
Traps 

Va Ives 



Vent Pipe 

Water Conditioners 

Water Supply System. 



STRUCTURAL AND OTHER ITEMS 

Acoustic Treatment 

Awnings 

Brick 

Brick Veneer 

Building Paper 

Cement 



Closet Fixtures 
Concrete Block 



Curtain and Drapery Hardware 

Doors 

Cellar Bulkhead - — 

Exterior 

Dumbwaiter 

Fence 



Financing 

Fireplace Equipment. 

Circulating Unit 

Dampers 

Log Hoist 

Mantel 

Flashing. 



Garage Doors. 



Automatic Control. 
Ha rdwa re 



Manufacturer or Firm 



HOME OWNERS' CATALOGS 



31 



Home Owners' product selector 






STRUCTURAL AND OTHER ITEMS (Cont'd) 

Kind or Material 



Garbage Receiver- 
Glass 

Double Glazing 

Glass Blocks 

M irro rs. 

Plate - 



Structural^ 

Window — 

Greenhouse- 



Gutters and Leaders- 



Hardware 
Incinerator- 
Insulation— 

Ceiling 

Floor 



Pipe and Duct- 
Roof 

Wall 

Insurance . 

Casua Ity 

Fire 

Life- 



Landscaping 

Fertilizer 

Laivn Seed- 

Nursery- 



Tree Surgery- 

Lift 



Brand 



Manufacturer or Firm 






Lumber 

Mill and Cabinet Work- 
Mortgages. 



Ornamental Iron Work- 
Paint Products 

Exterior 

Interior 

Special Uses 

Plaster — 



Plaster Base- 
Plywood 

Roofing 



Screens— 
Shingles. 



Sound Insulation. 

Stairs -. 

Attic . 

Stone 

Structural 
Stucco 



Steel. 



Venetian Blinds. 

Wallboard 

Wallpaper 

Walls 



Exterior 

Structural- 



Waterproofing 

Weatherstripping. 
Windows 



Window Shades 

Workshop Equipment- 



See "Room Check Lists" for additional products. 
Make similar lists for furniture, portable appliances and other items.